London Calling! – WWII, Churchill, and The Wolseley

Being a big WWII history buff, one of Jordan’s life goals was to visit the Imperial War Museum and Churchill War Rooms in London. Through the years I’ve also become a bit of a fangirl for this stuff, especially after watching documentaries like The World at War and reading books like Alan Clark’s Barbarossa: The Russian German Conflict, 1941-45.

We were both awed by what we saw today.

T-34 and M4 Sherman tanks, Spitfires, an Enigma de-coder that helped turn the tide of the war, personal letters between lovers, a moving look at the Holocaust, and much more painstakingly displayed. It was all there for us to experience and we soaked in as much as we could.

One could easily spend days here, and seeing both old and young faces around us, it’s clear how impactful WWII has been on generations.

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Churchill’s Bunker was both surreal and kind of spooky to walk through. It seemed a place frozen in time. One’s mind was filled with sounds iconic to WWII like old-timey phones ringing, crackly speeches from tube radios, and Churchill’s monotonous and gruff British voice that inspired so many.

We spent copious hours down there back in the 1940s, and emerged from the bunker into a dazzling London night.

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After a quick nap for me and a stroll across the bridge for Jordan, we met back up to decide on supper.

Oddly enough both of us were in the mood for meat and potatoes. Perhaps our souls were hankering for a good old fashioned meal.

Again our trusty concierge set us up with a great recommendation. Although The Wolseley was booked for reservations that night, we suggested we try our luck and stroll by.

And lucky for us, the host at The Wolseley was such a nice gentleman and he was able to accommodate us straight away despite how busy they were.

It seems every restaurant near St. James and Picadilly Circus has a grand story to tell. And The Wolseley was no exception.

According to their site, the space was owned by Wolseley Motors in 1921 and was designed to be a prestigious car showroom. Venetian and Florentine influences are clearly apparent with the restaurant’s grand pillars, arches and stairways.

The addition of a banking counter and offices with a Japanese lacquer theme came in 1927 when Barclays Bank acquired the building. The post box and stamp machine are still there today.

It was only in 2003 that it became the remarkably unstuffy restaurant with impeccable service and food that it is today.

Escargots à la Bourguignonne

Endive salad with bleu cheese and candied walnuts

Chopped Liver

Filet de Boeuf au Poivre

Tenderloin, pommes frites, kale

Lyonnaise Potatoes

Apple Strudel with vanilla ice cream

After our sumptuous meal, we walked the graceful London streets around us and mooned over this great city with its long turbulent history and its leading-edge present.

I think I’m starting to feel quite at home here. 🙂

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