Wild herbs Category

Ketchup & Rice

“EWWWW!,” I exclaimed with my best blech face. Sarah, my childhood neighbor (and one of the very few Korean girls in New Castle, PA), proceeded to pour Heinz ketchup all over her beautifully steamed bowl of sticky white Kokuho Rose rice. What was she thinking? Sure, pile on the stinky fermented cabbage, pickled burdock root, dried and fried anchovies, and Spam, but ketchup? That was just wrong.

Right?

Actually, it wasn’t until years later as a twenty-something when I traveled to Tokyo and discovered omu-rice, did I realize why Sarah didn’t flinch despite my outburst, as she ate that bowl of ketchup-y rice. The sweet and tangy western ingredient worked in the strange omu-omelette “paper”-wrapped dome of fried rice. It’s like when you spoon up a perfect mix of buttery hash browns, soft scrambled egg, and ketchup from an IHOP breakfast platter at 3 am (after you’ve been drinking).

I do confess, though, that I never really took to the cold Heinz on hot rice method. And I frankly get a little tired of the flavor about halfway through my omu-rice. Maybe it’s the Korean in me, but I find myself wanting to incorporate a pickle note or spicy kick.

This recipe is still easy and comforting, but brightens up the palate with fresh herb, heat, and texture.

Kicky Omu-rice
Adapted from the recipe by No Recipes

Fried Rice
1 chicken thigh, cut into 1″ pieces
1 small onion, diced
2 Tbsp vegetable or canola oil
2 cups cooked rice
3 Tbsp ketchup
1 Tbsp gochujang (Korean red pepper paste)
1/4 cup napa cabbage, chopped

Egg Blanket
2 eggs
salt
1 tbsp oil

Beat eggs – add a pinch of salt and pepper – and set aside.

Heat the oil in a non-stick pan and add the chicken. Cook for 1-2 minutes. Add the onion and cook until translucent. Mix in the cabbage and cook until slightly tender, about 3 minutes. Add the rice, ketchup and gochujang. Mix thoroughly.

Fill two deep bowls, about halfway, each with a mound of the rice. Set aside.

Heat same pan to medium, add a tbsp of oil and then the beaten eggs. Using a silicone spatula, gently fold the eggs over each other, until the majority of the eggs set and look like fluffy but shiny (moist) yellow clouds (about 3 minutes).

Blanket each mound of rice with the eggs. Garnish each top with chopped cilantro.

An EDD-ter’s Tour of Italy – Cooking Class in Tuscany

One of the absolute must-do things I had on my list was to take a cooking class in Tuscany. My agent was able to secure a private day at the Castello di Tornano. From the chef Manuel, we’d learn how to make traditional Tuscan dishes including fresh pasta, biscotti, and pork, and best of all, eat it all for lunch!

It was everything I imagined! Rejuvenating views of lush rolling hills and olive groves, citrus trees along a pebbly trail up to the castle, little kittens purring on the kitchen floor, and a charming chef who’s worked in his simple kitchen for over 20 years.

Getting there was an adventure!

Over 1000 years old, the castle has survived war, bloodshed, and political intrigue. It’s most famous and notorious owner was Warnellottus, lord of Tornano and Campi, who (long story short) shrewdly exploited the strategic position his castle and lands had between the warring city-states of Siena and Florence.

After a warm welcome by the chef, and a customary tsuts (as my mother-in-law would call it) of Prosecco which Chef Manuel insisted was a truly Tuscan tradition, abbiamo cucina (we began cooking)!

Cantuccini – Sweet almond biscuits with Vin Santo
While baking, the kitchen smelled of almonds, sugar and Vin Santo.



Pomodori al forno – Roasted tomatoes with garlic, capers, hipollito, breadcrumbs, parmesan

This simple appetizer was the perfect way to whet our appetites. We used a local wild Italian herb called hipollito (?) for the mixture on top. It looked like oregano but tasted like a cross between thyme and mint.

Ravioli ricotta e spinaci, salvia e burro salsa – Ricotta and spinach ravioli, sage and butter sauce
Making fresh pasta was the highlight of my lesson! Practice makes perfect. We must have made 3 or 4 dozen!

Costolette di maiale salsa Chianti – Pork cutlets with wild rosemary, juniper berries, Chianti Classico
This dish perfectly captured the essence of our Tuscan afternoon at Tornano.

I must say I was feeling mighty fine after our amazing lesson and lunch. We strolled around the castle grounds a bit and enjoyed the sun as the mist slowly drifted away.

Now all that was missing was a long nap.

Those sleepy kitties had the right idea…

Next up: Florence! P.S. recipes for all the above coming soon!