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Our Adventure in Kauai: Day 6

We were on the road to Hanakapiai Trail from Ke’e Beach by 5:30am the next morning. The drive takes one to two hours depending on when you leave. It only took us an hour, but we knew that the hike to Hanakapiai Falls would require at least four hours, and an early start meant less people.

The hike begins at the northern entrance to the famous Kalalau trail which is known for its incredible views and the dangers involved in getting to those views. On my helicopter ride, I literally got a birds eye view of this trail. I kid you not, the “trail” is barely that. By the looks of two hikers braving the trail at the time – their stomachs and faces pressed tightly against the red dirt mountain side – it truly seemed the foothold couldn’t have been that much wider than a size 7 foot. Add in a perpetual mist off the teeming ocean directly below, and constant wind erosion, and it’s no wonder hikers die every year from attempting to trek the entire 11 mile trail.

Although it’s possible to hike the Kalalau in a day, it’s highly recommended that hikers take two days. But a nice alternative for those of us not quite ready to fall to our deaths (at least not yet) is to hike to Hanakapiai Falls which is about 8 miles and doesn’t require a meeting with your life insurance agent. The hike starts at Ke’e Beach and goes along the coast, veers inland into a lush canyon, then ends up at one of the most beautiful waterfalls on the island. And this hike is no cake walk either, especially if rains have made the trail very slick and extremely muddy, like we experienced.

But it is one of the shorter hikes you can do with incredible scenery along the way, and a major payoff at the end. Take a look.

When we arrived, we spotted a natural rock alcove overlooking the falls, and climbed up to have a simple but perfectly satisfying lunch of cold rosemary roast chicken, apples, trail mix, and more homemade ahi jerky from Living Foods . I also had some excellent lilikoi-lychee Kauai Kombucha. This was one of the most memorable lunches I’ve had in my life.

We made it back to Ke’e Beach just when the trail was getting crowded.

We were filthy and glowing.

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On the drive back, we hit up Joe’s Banana Stand and each had an incredible pineapple “frosty” which transforms frozen pieces of the ripest, sweetest pineapple and banana into a creamy delight (no dairy included). Also for the first time, we got to sample some rare poha berries and Sugar Loaf white pineapple.

Poha berries are tropical fruits that originated in South America and were brought to the Islands by early settlers. The berries come from the tomato family, and like tomatillos, have a papery husk. The fruits are a beautiful orangish yellow, and are softly tart and sweetly floral. Sugar Loaf white pineapple is exactly as delectable as it sounds. I love pineapple as it is, but imagine it with a core as tender and sweet as the flesh around it. Sugar Loaf is indeed a beautiful cream-white color, as well.

I felt like I had stopped at the edible candy cottage in Hansel and Gretel, except in place of a witch, there was a charming older hippie couple running the place.

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Our next stop was Kilauea where we had a few comforting slices of pizza at the charming Kilauea Bakery and Pau Hana Pizza.

And we made it just in time for the Kilauea Sunshine Farmer’s Market. It was small, but no trip is complete for me without perusing an open air market. This one happened to have a vendor offering young coconut to drink and eat (with coconut shell “spoon”) too. Bonus!

Funny enough, we also spotted our crazy hiking guide Steve on a bike on his way to the market with who must have been his girlfriend from Tasmania (he had mentioned her several times to us on our hike).

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Last stop was a joint that screamed out at us to stop and sample: Chicken in a Barrel. Crazy smoky chicken that’s slow cooked in oil drums on the side of the road, the chicken was rich, hearty and plenty smoky. And one serving could easily feed two.

We also sampled a side of the pulled Hawaiian pork with Hawaiian BBQ sauce, as well. The pork was tasty (I mean, it’s smoked pork!), but if you visit Chicken in a Barrel, you should go there for the chicken. Don’t forget to try the potato salad and condiments they’ve got lined up at the counter too. You’ll definitely get the local vibe eating this chicken while sitting at one of their picnic tables on the side of the road, smoking oil drums going nonstop right next to you.

There’s no place like a [Korean] home…

Just when I’m getting cabin fever and feeling homesick, my photo archive reveals a treasure trove of pictures from a visit back home to Pennsylvania where my parents still live. I know it’s trite to say, but memories do indeed fuel the wonder only dishes from home can bring to the soul; especially when you come from a Korean family that loves to eat!

First let’s talk about what to me is the quintessential Korean dish (besides kimchee, of course), bibimbap. Bibimbap literally translates to “mixed rice.” It’s become so mainstream, you find it on the menu in the most unlikely of places. Even just today I discovered that Chicago’s famous gastropub The Publican’s Sunday brunch menu features a pork belly bibimbap!

Bibimbap works for so many reasons, not least of which is that when it’s made at home it takes no prep whatsoever. It originated from literally taking whatever leftover rice and banchan you had (traditional small dishes to eat with rice), throwing it all in a big bowl, adding lots of gochujang (bright red, sweet and spicy fermented chili and soybean paste) and a sunny side up egg (if you had it), and mixing and incorporating everything together until your arm hurt. Then the fam would each grab a spoon (somehow it seems to taste better with a long stem metal Korean spoon), and communally dig in! Even clean up is easy!

And just as layers of flavor permeate bibimbap, so does this dish speak to the rich agricultural history and resourcefulness intrinsic not only to making Korean food, but also eating it. At its core, it’s a no frills, hearty kind of eating spiced up with fire from plenty of hot chiles.

These photos were taken from Christmas 2011. We had a bunch of tasty banchan from my Mom and during a visit to my aunt’s house, a bibim party ensued with gusto! It’s always a special treat when my Dad decides to be the “Bimbim Master,” as we kids like to call him.

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This is the kind of spread waiting for me when I visit home. Gawd. Moms should be recognized as the ninth wonders of the world. All of this was made from scratch, yo.

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We also had some other memorable dishes from the visit including homemade Duk Mandoo Guk (beef soup with beef dumplings and rice cakes) and Guksu jongol (spicy casserole with noodles). Had to throw these in too because they are absolute pure comfort food for any Korean!

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Pure comfort indeed.

London Calling! Fond Farewell

“When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford”
– Samuel Johnson

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I was all sniffles on the way to the airport, and it wasn’t from the wet chill outside, I’ll tell you that.

Yeah, I was grumpy all right. And I preferred indulging in my melancholia instead of reveling in all the wonders we experienced in just four days…

like this…

and this…

and oh my gosh, this…

And finally this!

See, why I’m so grumpy!?

Well, always the stalwart optimist, Jordan seemed to know exactly what would cheer me up.

And in his wisdom, he followed his appetite.

What better than a proper English breakfast to send us on our way?

Needless to say, this brought a very, very big smile to my face.

🙂

My tummy and heart salutes you, London!

Cheerio!

London Calling! – From Britain to Belgium in a day

Morrissey woke me up this morning.

“Here is London, giddy London, Is it home of the free or what?” So, what’s got me so giddy?

Medieval torture of course! Traitorous prisoners, the beheaded ghost of Anne Boleyn, the reviled White Tower, and the infamous Crown Jewels!

On the menu today: The Tower of London!

A nice addition to the tour was a trip through the Royal Armories. Jordan and I geeked out so hard on all the swords, axes, crossbows, and overall medieval pageantry of the exhibit.

It hit me only afterwards that today was our last full day in London. Yikes, we still had so much to do!

The British Museum was next, but before that, we headed straight for the Underground. We absolutely couldn’t leave London without sampling Britain’s “true national dish” Chicken Tikka Masala!

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Brick Lane and Whitechapel are known as ethnically diverse, primarily Bengali, neighborhoods in London. Devon Avenue in Chicago has a similar vibe.

Funny enough, Whitechapel is also where the Jack the Ripper murders occurred apparently, but today, it’s a vibrant community where English it seems is everyone’s second language.

We decided on Zayyabs. It’s actually a Pakistani place so we knew the dish would be slightly different than the creamier Indian version. But as chicken tikka masala is also one of those dishes that varies from chef to cook to region like any good paella, gumbo, or feijoda, we decided to go for it.

And we are so glad we did. Every dish was densely spiked with spices, richly layered, heavily perfumed, and authentic to the bone.

The only bad thing about our lunch at Zayyab’s was the inevitable food coma that followed.

Thank ye gods for the long Tube ride to the British Museum.

Power nap, go!

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The British Museum is an unbelievable treasure.

Packed inside this enormous structure is an arena of antiquities spanning from the Far East to the Far West and everywhere in between.

I had to force my mind to focus. The countless stories behind these objects of old pushed and pulled at my imagination as I walked the halls. It was marvelously overwhelming!

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As we descended the grand white steps in front of the Greek Revival façade of the Museum, Jordan and I felt we had zoomed through centuries of history in just a few short hours. Naturally our heads were buzzing and our stomachs rumbling.

So we made our way down a few streets to Le Bistro Savoir Faire.

The charming French brasserie invited us in with its rosy ambiance. Its cherry wood framed windows, French sconces, white napkins, and quotations and French cartoons painted across the walls fit our contemplative moods perfectly.

We supped on paté, bouillabaisse, warm baguette with butter and salt, bone-in ham, and a light Pinot Noir.

And for dessert, we exchanged thoughts on the past few days whilst taking turns cracking the caramelized sugar sheet on our crème brulee.

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I felt I was dream walking when we left Le Bistro only to “wake” up in another dream – this one full of sparkle, whimsy, and good cheer. It was Christmas on Oxford Street. Amongst cascades of twinkling white, blue, green, and silver lights, Jordan and I shared one final sweet before surrendering to sleep.

Liege gauffre or Liege waffles from The Waffle Place. What makes the Liege waffles so up and beyond is the batter which has chunks of sugar in it. When cooked the sugar chunks caramelize to form a crispy almost candied coating on the top of the waffle.

Happy Christmas indeed!

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