New Orleans Category

Meals from the Pantry: Sunday Chicken and Sausage Gumbo

One pot meals that get better over time are all the rage in our house lately. I’ve gotten in the habit of leisurely cooking a bit pot o’ something in my trusty Le Creuset dutch oven on Sundays, and it’s made dinners during the week (and lunches for the hubby) so convenient and stress-free.

Here’s a recipe I adapted from the iconic Uglesich’s Restaurant Cookbook for a Chicken and Sausage Gumbo. Their version takes two days, so I created my own version that still delivers the lusciousness and comfort of a traditional gumbo, while staying user- and pantry-friendly. If you want to kick it up for an occasion, use rabbit instead of chicken!

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Sunday Chicken and Sausage Gumbo
Adapted from The Uglesich’s Restaurant Cookbook

Ingredients
1/4 cup canola oil
1/2 cup flour
1 medium white onion
2 stalk celery, chopped
1/2 green bell pepper, chopped
1 bunch of scallions, chopped (white part mostly)
4 cloves of garlic, chopped
2 tbsp of parsley, chopped
1 dry bay leaf
3/4 tsp dry thyme
1/2 tsp dry marjoram
1/2 tsp dry basil
2 tbsp file powder
1 tbsp cayenne
1 tbsp Cajun spice powder (no salt version)
1 can (28 oz) crushed tomatoes
1 1/2 cartons (32 oz each) low sodium chicken broth
1/2 lb andouille sausage, sliced into about 1/2″ thick pieces
1/2 lb (half pkg) Hilshire Farm beef smoked sausage, sliced into about 1/2″ thick pieces
2 lbs chicken breast (boneless, skinless)
Worcestershire Sauce
Salt
Black pepper
Hot sauce

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The hardest part of this gumbo is the prep. And the hardest part about the prep is poaching the chicken. And the hardest part of poaching chicken is being patient and trusting it’s getting cooked in the pot even though the water is barely simmering!

Poached Chicken
Recipe adapted from About.com

Ingredients
2 lbs boneless skinless chicken breasts
4-5 cups water
1 bay leaf
5 whole black peppercorns
Pinch of salt

Cut each chicken breast in half so they are all about the same size. Place chicken breasts snugly in ideally one layer in the bottom of a heavy-bottomed pot. If you have some pieces on a second layer, I wouldn’t sweat it but just try to layer evenly. Cover chicken with water (make sure all is covered). Add bay leaf, salt, and whole black peppercorns. Stir water just to stop the herbs from floating.

Bring to a boil, then immediately reduce heat to low so that the water is barely at a simmer. Partly covered, simmer for 10-15 minutes. Turn off heat completely, and allow chicken to remain in hot water for 15-20 minutes.

Remove chicken to a bowl until it is lukewarm. Shred the chicken and set aside.

This can be prepared a day ahead. Cover and refrigerate over night.

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Now that you’ve got your chicken done, it’s time to gumbo! I highly recommend that you prep and assemble all the ingredients in a mise en place fashion so that you don’t get bogged down in chopping here and measuring there. Especially for something like a gumbo where a lot goes into a pot, not having to worry about prep while you’re cooking allows you to really focus on the flavor and seasoning which is where it’s all at anyway!

In a large pot or dutch oven, add the oil and set on medium heat.

When the oil is hot, add the flour. Try to sprinkle it evenly over the oil. You’re about to make a roux which is as traditional as traditional gets in Creole Cajun cooking! By using a whisk or a wooden spoon (I like to use both based on how things are progressing), stir the flour into the oil for about 20 to 30 minutes. You’ll see a lovely transformation take place where the flour and oil mixture transforms into a creamy base the color of peanut butter.

Add the onions, celery, green pepper, scallions, garlic and parsley. Saute until veggies soften and are mixed well with the roux.

Add the thyme, basil, bay leaf, cayenne, and about a teaspoon of salt and a half teaspoon of black pepper. Stir into veggie and roux mixture, then pour in can of crushed tomatoes.

Again continue to incorporate all ingredients well, then add the chicken broth.

Give everything a good stir and then add the shredded chicken, andouille, smoked sausage, file powder, Cajun spice powder, and some healthy dashes of both the Worcestershire sauce, and your favorite Louisiana pepper sauce or Cajun hot sauce.

Jordan being a hot sauce fanatic ensures we always have a good variety, but use what you like and how spicy you make it is up to you!

Bring the gumbo up to a boil, then turn down the heat until you have a gentle simmer.

Simmer on low partially covered for 2 to 2.5 hours, stirring occasionally.

Taste and season as needed with salt and pepper and cayenne and/or hot sauce (as desired).

Serve over cooked rice.

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This is definitely one of those dishes that gets better and better the longer it sits, but you’re going to want to treat yourself to a least a little bowl! Don’t forget you can garnish with a little chopped scallion on top too, and maybe a couple dashes of your favorite hot sauce.

Woo-eee!

Spring in NOLA: Beignets in Bed

Our last day in sunny New Orleans. An beautiful otherworldly destination full of passion, emotion, soul, and a unique history of which the food is just as much an adventure as the stories any local on the street could recant for you.

One of my most favorite memories of the entire trip was on this our last day.

It is the memory of being awoken by the sound of crispy pillows of fried sweet dough shaking around in a paper bag filled to bursting with powdered sugar, and the aroma of just-brewed hot chicory coffee awaiting me as I rise sleepily out of bed.

Jordan surprised me with breakfast in bed, or should I say “beignets in bed” this morning.

Yep, that’s my husband all right. I think I done got me keeper. 🙂

Thanks honey and thanks New Orleans for memories that I savor, relish, and will dream of returning to.

X O X O

Spring in NOLA: Crawfish Boil to John Besh’s August

Another glorious morning in what was becoming like a second home to us. We couldn’t believe our luck as temps ranged in the 80s yet again and it was sunny as sunny could be!

Today, we were off to explore NOLA’s Magazine Street – famous for its eclectic shops. Maybe we’d find some gifties for our friendsies.

But of course, like a moth to flame, we ended up eating big time yet again. I hadn’t even planned on this or even heard about it. Promise!

Big Fisherman Seafood called to us like mystical Sirens out in the fog of sea…calling to us…hypnotizing us…come eat…crabs…oysters…shrimp…crawfish…

How could I possibly turn away from a place that has this sign outside of it?!

And has this kind of heavenly spread inside?

I mean…c’mon!

We had naught to do but get a pound of freshly cajun boiled crawfish and 2 cajun corn on the cobs; nevermind that we had no where to sit down and eat our snack with all its messes.

But you’re never too far from laid back hospitality in New Orleans. A casual (and kind of trendy) alfresco eatery across the street was kind enough to let us chow down at one of their tables as long as we cleaned up after and ordered a couple cokes.

How cool is that?

So that’s just what we did! And it was soooo worth it.

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But seriously folks, that’s not all.

Tonight we would dine at the place that was on my short list for must-visit fine dining restaurants in the States.

And John Besh’s August did not disappoint.

Our meal was superb, expertly prepared, and yet comforting like a good Nawlin’s meal should be. To top it all off, Chef Besh was super friendly and as his periodic visits to various tables throughout the place showed, an amazing host as well. You could really feel how much he cared and was passionate about the experience. Makes all the difference in the world, I’ll tell ya.

Oh yeah, and did I mention the food?

Redfish “courtbouillon”
Persillade crust, jumbo shrimp, blue crab, and sauce bourride

Hand-made potato gnocchi tossed with blue crab and winter truffle


Salad of heirloom beets, crab meat, cherry wood bacon, mizuna, and quail eggs with black-eyed pea croutons



P&J Oysters: crispy fried with Louisiana caviar “ranch dressing,” pepper seared with truffle spoon bread, horseradish crusted

“Breaded” speckled trout Louisiana crab, white shrimp, toasted almonds and sauce mousseline

Special: Goat three-ways

Napoleon of nougatine with Valrhona chocolate bavarois and salted toffee ice cream

Trio of gelee, chocolate, and pralines

The trip home in the dewy Spring night made for another amazing day in this magical place.

Spring in NOLA: Swamps, Shells, and a Dream Come True

We started bright and early the next day and went on the Honey Island Swamp Tour. It was like we were in some untouched fantasy land full of creatures, strange plants, and adventure! These guys do a great job by the way and I highly recommend them for a small group tour.

The Original Honey Island Swamp Tour

Afterwards what better to fill our swamp bellies but with some incredibly addictive Johnny’s Po Boys. Despite how famous and touristy this place is, it’s still legit eats! Soft-shell crab for me, oyster for Jordan, and a side of their sweet jambalaya to share!

Soft-shell Crab Po’ Boy

Fried Oyster Po’ Boy

Sweet Jambalaya

The only thing more killer than these po’ boys was the mega-nap Jordan and I took after…zzz…the….zzzzzz…

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One word: Middendorf’s! Waaaay back when Jordan and I started dating, one of our first conversations about food was about his days as a child in Mississippi. He spoke with such passion and affection for a place in Manshac, Louisiana that he and his family would go to on special occasions. It lies on the isthmus between Lake Maurepas and Lake Ponchatrain, and he’d spin yarns about sucking crawfish heads and tails over cajun spice-soaked newspaper table cloths. He’d also talk of the fried platters with such gusto that the memory became a food goal for me. And guess what, check off one ticker box for this girl!

“We’re with you through Thick and Thin!” – Middendorf’s

All manner of crustacean in this gumbo!

Fresh big boiled critters!

Middendorf’s Special Fried Thin Catfish

Old School Deviled Crab

Shrimp and Catfish

This was a dream come true, and Middendorf’s remains a living legend.

If you ever get to New Orleans and want a quick fun road trip around local parts, Middendorf’s is truly worth it!

Trust me on this! Git! Git!